Help and hope for gangrene

DISTILLED WATERS TESTIMONIALS:

10 CASE HISTORIES OF GANGRENE

PS Urine is NOT a waste product!
Ten Case Histories of Supposedly Incurable Gangrene From John W. Armstrong’s THE WATER OF LIFE:

“Gangrene, described in simple language as “death of a part,” is regarded as hopeless of cure by the orthodox physician. “Gangrene has set in” is a phrase invariably accepted as the last stage which precedes the almost immediate decease of the victim. Where gangrenes sets in after a finger, toe or limb has been amputated, it is often fatal, especially in the case of persons past middle age. All the same, I have proved that gangrene can be easily cured.

My first acquaintance with the ravages of gangrene was in 1891 when I was a schoolboy of ten. My closest schoolmate had complained of face‐ ache for some days before being taken to a local dentist for the extraction of a tooth far back in the jaw. Unfortunately some of the jaw came away with the molar, and gangrene set in. Drugs and ointments were applied to reduce (or perhaps better said suppress) the swelling, and the boy died ten days later.

It so happened that at the same time as my schoolmate was suffering, I also had a swollen cheek. But the remedy my mother applied (she was a farmer’s daughter, by the way) was a very different one from the “scientific” ones the doctors had applied to my young friend. True, my own swollen cheek was the result of having been stung by a lot of bees, owing to my having disturbed a colony of those interesting little creatures. All the same it was very painful, till my mother completely cured it by first bathing my face in urine and then binding it up with pieces of linen wrung out in the same healing fluid. My cheek was normal in a few hours.
This treatment was suggested to the parents of my schoolmate with the gangrenous jaw‐but merely to be rejected with scorn and expressions of disgust. I have since come to know that urine compresses combined with urine‐drinking and fasting could have saved my unfortunate friend

water heart

About a year later a young man of our acquaintance died of either gangrene, medical treatment for the condition, or perhaps both. While he was ill, I used to go and read to him; and during one of my visits, the doctor called. He was a very loquacious practitioner, and after a few cheering stock phrases, added that whoever found a cure for this dreadful affliction would merit a crown of gold. Had he “read, marked, learned and inwardly digested ” the old book I have already quoted, on the value of urine for “any green wound” he might have known that a cure had already been found years ago. As it was, I little thought then that it would be given to me to prove the truth of that sentence, and much less did the thought occur to me that it would not be a crown of gold I should receive, but metaphorically speaking, a crown of thorns! For although the story is not relevant to this book, I have had to suffer for my doctrines and their demonstration.The first case of gangrene I ever treated was in 1920. The patient was a lady of fifty‐three. She had been in the care of a well‐known Bradford physician who was an authority on fasting and dietetics. Anaemia had developed, the lungs showed signs of grave disturbance, and there was a gangrenous condition in one foot, with a number of skin eruptions of varying dimensions on each leg. There was also a jaundiced condition which had turned her complexion to that of an Eurasian, and the whites of her eyes yellow. Her abdomen was distended and hard, and her body had become thin and scraggy almost to emaciation.

Although the doctor was quite willing that my method should be tried for at least a month, I was loathe to advise upon the case, for I felt that no period of less than sixty to seventy days would restore the patient to health, however, to my surprise, some encouraging developments occurred fairly quickly, and gave me the first opportunity of observing that gangrene is far from being that hopeless condition which the public and the doctors have been led to believe.

By dint of fasting the patient on her own urine and water, and rubbing urine into her body and applying urine compresses, at the end of ten days the kidneys and bowels were working “overtime,” and though the eruptions had increased, they were less irritable. The breathing became normal and easy, the patient slept better, and above all, the gangrenous foot began to show signs of healing.
By the eighteenth day of the fast the foot was quite normal; the urine had formed new skin, and there was no trace whatever of the livid abrasions. The foot had healed without even leaving a scar.
Yet need we be surprised, once we understand that urine is not dead matter, but so to say, flesh, blood vital tissues in living solution?

As the result of this cure, I was invited to take on another case of gangrene. It was that of a woman ‘in the early forties. Her right leg was in such a state, of putrefaction that her medical adviser had urged amputation of the limb.

The trouble had begun nearly two years previously with a swelling at the ankle. This had been ascribed to her occupation which entailed much kneeling on a hard stone floor. She had submitted herself to many treatments, both orthodox and unorthodox, but her afflictions merely increased. She suffered from severe constipation, piles, eczema, anaemia, insomnia, tic nerveux, general depression, sore mouth and tongue, faceache, eruptions at each corner of the lips‐and above all, more cavities had occurred in the gangrenous leg. In spite of her tribulations, however, she was a woman, of great spirit, and I had no difficulty in persuading her to fast on all the urine she passed, and up to six half pints a day of cold water, which she always sipped.

During the first five days of the penance the eruptions began to disappear, and the skin in every part of her body began to look healthier in every respect. The face-ache vanished by the second day, on the third night she slept soundly after weeks of insomnia, and by the end of the first week, the bowels and kidneys were working “overtime” and the piles were cured. In a fortnight there was no sign of the gangrene, and new skin had grown in place of the cavities. The diseased leg, which previously had become twice the size of the other one, was now completely normal‐not even a scar remaining anywhere to remind her of what she had suffered! I subsequently put my recovered patient on an exclusive diet of grapes, bananas and raw tomatoes for a week in small quantities, added fresh unpasteurised milk for the second week, and in the third week finally got her back on a normal diet.

According to my experience, gangrene is often much quicker in response than many other major or “killing” diseases, a matter which may be seen from a few brief case‐sheets which I now will add. I should mention that nearly all these cases were treated after the physicians had urged amputation.

Mrs. E. Gangrenous feet and toes following upon paralysis after vaccines had been administered, 48 days fast. Urine healed feet and toes in the first 20 days.

Mr. D. Diabetic gangrene of left forearm. Fasted 48 days for the diabetes. Arm completely normal after 18 days. No scar.

Mr. J.W.B. (60 years old). Gangrene of first and second joints of thumb, caused by a hammer‐blow in mason work. Treated for 18 weeks as an out‐patient at Leeds G.I. Bone removed up to first joint. Discolouration spread towards wrist. Fasted according to my method, applied urine compresses to whole hand, wrist and arm. Cured in one week.

Miss C.A. (aged 10 in 1930) Anaemia. Gangrene of both legs following suppressive treatment for psoriasis. Large areas of skinless and livid flesh in both calves. Fasted 18 days. Cure complete. No more anaemia, no more psoriasis, no scars from gangrenous legs. Grew 1 and 1/2 inches during fast. Is now a member of the A.T.S. in H.M. Forces. Height above the average.

Mrs. B. Gangrenous finger, also severe conjunctivitis following a year’s use of atropin. Fasted 12 days for gangrene, then a week later undertook a second fast for the conjunctivitis which cleared up the 23rd day. Age 38 in 1927. Still looks much the same age.

Mr. J.I. (age 54 at the time.) Thumb cut by fish‐bone. Gangrene ensued. Doctor attended him the same day. Surgeon’s decision to amputate rejected. Fasted 14 days. Body rubbed with urine, finger poulticed in very strong old urine. Improvement after three days of treatment. Cure complete after twelve days.

Mr. N (age about 55 at the time.) Tubercular gangrene of both legs. Surgeons wanted to amputate the limbs. His wife refused. Condition of patient very emaciated. Great depression after much drugging. Fasted 42 days according to my method. Now walks as well as any man, and enjoys the exercise.

Mrs. L. (age 48 at the time.) Gangrene of both legs and feet after spilling a large vessel of boiling fat over them. Treated with plasters during three weeks by the Result disastrous. Fasted 28 days, with physicians the usual treatment I advocate. Marked improvement after ten days. Return to normal health after a fortnight.

Many other cases could be cited. But as I do not wish to swell the bulk of this book with an unnecessary number of case‐sheets when a few should be sufficient to convince any but the most prejudiced, I will forbear. I think I may say that what I have here put forward should explode the dogma that gangrene is incurable.”

— from THE WATER OF LIFE, A Treatise on Urine Therapy, by John W. Armstrong, 1971.




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